Friday, August 28, 2009

Trend Summary - The Classics

images from style.com

Some designers are playing it safe in the current economic climate, returning to wardrobe staples like camel hair and trench coats, chanel and tweed suits, pin-stripes and prince of wales checks, and double-breasted jackets, in neutral colours.
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It's an opportunity for the rest of us to add some timeless pieces to our wardrobe.
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Mix with the latest styles and accessories for a fresh, to-the-minute look.

2 comments:

  1. After googling, I found out that the Prince of Wales check is similar to what I have always called a glen plaid. One website said that there is a distinct difference between the two, but I can't see it.

    I enjoy your fashion trend updates and the other very informative posts.

    Keep up the good work!

    Kathryn

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  2. kathryn,
    thanks for dropping by.
    you've intrigued me enough re: differences between Glen Plaid and Prince of Wales check, for me to do some research.

    I always understood the two were synonymous.
    But there seems to be 2 lines of thought.

    Wikipedia says:
    "Glen plaid is sometimes nicknamed the Prince of Wales check, as it was popularized by the Duke of Windsor when Prince of Wales."

    A search also found http://www.bensilver.com/style04/about_clothingTerms.htm who seemed very confident of their assessment of the situation:

    GLEN URQUHART CHECK:
    Widely misnamed 'Prince of Wales' after Duke of Windsor who wore it often when Prince of Wales. For authentic version see PRINCE OF WALES CHECK. Authentic Glen Urquhart is actually only in black and white - with no colored overcheck - though popular misusage has come to embrace such in the title. Strictly, these latter can be loosely described as 'Glen' checks.

    PRINCE OF WALES CHECK:
    Name widely but wrongly applied to the Glen Urquhart check and similar checks with a colored overcheck. These were popularized by the Duke of Windsor when he was Prince of Wales. The authentic Prince of Wales Check was designed by King Edward VII when he was Prince of Wales, as livery for his shootings at Abergeldie House on Scotland’s Deeside. It is of similar pattern to the Glen Urquhart but nearly twice its size on the repeat, and far too big to illustrate here. Its authentic colors are red-brown on a white ground, with a slat-grey overcheck.

    i suppose the right people to pose the question to would be one of the saville row guys such as The English Cut, but he's on honeymoon at the moment (according to his blog) and i doubt if he could be bothered by such trifling questions from an industry minion like moi.

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